Sunday, December 16, 2007

John F. Kennedy Presidentential Library & Museum

Took subway to J.F.K Library from Harvard.

The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum

Took Subway to J.F.K Library after we left Harvard.

The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum is dedicated to the memory of our nation's thirty-fifth president and to all those who through the art of politics seek a new and better world.



Located on a ten-acre park, overlooking the sea that he loved and the city that launched him to greatness, the Library stands as a vibrant tribute to the life and times of John F. Kennedy.

1961, U.S. President John F. Kennedy had a challenge for NASA. The challenge was to land a man on the moon before the end of the decade (before 1970). The race to meet his goal would require the greatest technological achievement the world has ever seen. The first Apollo missions were spent getting ready for the moon landing. Apollo 8 and Apollo 10 even flew all the way to the moon, around it, and back to Earth. Finally, everything was ready. On July 16, 1969, Apollo 11 launched from Kennedy Space Center in Florida. They traveled to the moon and arrived in lunar orbit on July 19.

Harvard, Cambridge Massachuetts



Took subway to Harvard, it was like stepping back in time. Very, very old.
The Early History of Harvard University

Harvard University, which celebrated its 350th anniversary in 1986, is the oldest institution of higher learning in the United States. Founded 16 years after the arrival of the Pilgrims at Plymouth, the University has grown from nine students with a single master to an enrollment of more than 18,000 degree candidates, including undergraduates and students in 10 principal academic units. An additional 13,000 students are enrolled in one or more courses in the Harvard Extension School. Over 14,000 people work at Harvard, including more than 2,000 faculty. There are also 7,000 faculty appointments in affiliated teaching hospitals.

Seven presidents of the United States – John Adams, John Quincy Adams, Theodore and Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Rutherford B. Hayes, John Fitzgerald Kennedy and George W. Bush – were graduates of Harvard. Its faculty have produced more than 40 Nobel laureates.

Harvard College was established in 1636 by vote of the Great and General Court of the Massachusetts Bay Colony and was named for its first benefactor, John Harvard of Charlestown, a young minister who, upon his death in 1638, left his library and half his estate to the new institution. Harvard's first scholarship fund was created in 1643 with a gift from Ann Radcliffe, Lady Mowlson.

During its early years, the College offered a classic academic course based on the English university model but consistent with the prevailing Puritan philosophy of the first colonists. Although many of its early graduates became ministers in Puritan congregations throughout New England, the College was never formally affiliated with a specific religious denomination. An early brochure, published in 1643, justified the College's existence: "To advance Learning and perpetuate it to Posterity; dreading to leave an illiterate Ministry to the Churches."

Harvard College was established in 1636 by vote of the Great and General Court of the Massachusetts Bay Colony and was named for its first benefactor, John Harvard of Charlestown, a young minister who, upon his death in 1638, left his library and half his estate to the new institution. Harvard's first scholarship fund was created in 1643 with a gift from Ann Radcliffe, Lady Mowlson.

During its early years, the College offered a classic academic course based on the English university model but consistent with the prevailing Puritan philosophy of the first colonists. Although many of its early graduates became ministers in Puritan congregations throughout New England, the College was never formally affiliated with a specific religious denomination. An early brochure, published in 1643, justified the College's existence: "To advance Learning and perpetuate it to Posterity; dreading to leave an illiterate Ministry to the Churches."

Walked around Harvard Square, and did some shopping for tee-shirts and souvenirs .

Harvard Square is a crossroads for students from all over the world, it has many boutiques and bookshops. The square is always crowded with interesting people..

What a amazing place to see.

Also went by M.I.T. Did not walk but saw it from a bus tour earlier.

Wednesday, December 5, 2007

Mary Baker Eddy

Part of the walking tour was also the Copp's burial grounds

The Mary Baker Eddy library, mapparium was so moving. You walk thru a glass globe.



A one-of-a-kind place, the Mapparium is a three-story, stained glass globe constructed between 1932 and 1935...a world made out of glass.
Allot of my pictures were ruined as the film got stuck, so I had to buy a disposable camera to use from then on. The pictures did not come out as good as my camera but had to do.

We had lunch at legal sea foods. The clam chowder was excellent. A little pricey but a must do if you plan a trip to Boston.

After walking tour all day and part of evening, we went to Newbury street, which is very high end, and got a ice tea at Starbucks. Headed back to Hotel and called it a night. It was very historical and a wonderful experience. I know that I left allot of places we saw out of this, but if you go on walking tour you will see allot more of the places we saw.

Beantown Trolly


Took Bean town Trolley

We did not go to all the places they offered as you needed 2 days to be able to see them all.

We saw the North end/Paul Revere house.
Old North Church
U.S.S. Constitution/Old Iron sides




Boston Common
State House
Beacon Hill
Copley Square
Newbury Street

And allot more but to much to list.

Sunday, December 2, 2007

Wampanoag Village,Plimoth MA



Wampanoag means "Eastern People" or "People of first light" The Wanpanoag people have lived in southeastern New England for over 12,000 years. Before 1616, there were approximately 50,000 Wanpanoag People in about 67 different villages in the Wampanoag territory. Between 1616 and 1618, a devastating plague, carried by Europeans , caused the deaths of many thousands of Wampanoag.


A Mishoon (dugout canoe) is made by burning and scraping an oak, pine or chestnut log.


The Wampanoag made houses called Wetuash, that were dome-shaped and covered with bark.